James Madison University

Students and Faculty Present Research

Students and faculty from the Assessment and Measurement PhD program and the Psychological Sciences Master’s program presented papers and posters at the recent meeting of the American Psychological Society.

Research presentations:


(students’ names are in bold)

Bandalos, D. L., & Kopp, J. P. (2013, May). Using the bifactor model in scale construction. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, D. C.

Charsha, A., Anderson,R., & Smiley, W. (2013, May). Building a case for validity: Establishing a measure o cognitive engagement. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington D.C.

Fisher, R. C., Gerstner, J. J., & Bandalos, D. L. (2013, May). A review and analysis of scale development procedures in psychology and education. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington D.C.

Hopkins D.N., Swain M.S., Williams L.M., Finney S.J., & Sundre D.L. (2013, May). Investigating the dimensionality of test-taking motivation across consequential test conditions. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington D.C.

Swain M.S., Williams L.M., Hopkins D.N., Sundre D.L., & Finney S.J. (2013, May). Investigating the (neglected) role of personality in testing. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington D.C.

Naumenko, O., Hulleman, C. S., & Patterson, H. J. (2013, May). Increasing confidence in assessment results: Quasi-Experimental approaches. Poster presented at the Association for Psychological Science Conference, Washington, DC.

Gerstner, J. J., & Bandalos, D. L. (2013, May). An evaluation of the use of exploratory factor analysis in scale development. Poster to be presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, D.C.

Fisher, R. C., Gerstner, J. J., & Bandalos, D. L. (2013, May). A review and analysis of scale development procedures in psychology and education. Poster to be presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington D.C.

Students talk about their experiences at APS:


Laura Williams, first year doctoral student in the Assessment and Measurement program:

The APS conference in DC was my first opportunity to attend a psychology research-focused conference as a doctoral student.  I appreciated the diversity of the sessions: there was everything from methodology to research on PTSD.  At times it was difficult to figure out which session would be the most interesting!  Ultimately, most of what I chose to see what focused on methodology.  Perhaps the most interesting session was focused on good data practices, particularly related to power and p-values.  The presenters in this symposium did a great job making me think critically about how we choose to design our studies.

This was also my first time presenting a poster at a research-focused conference.  Coming from a Student Affairs background, this was a completely new experience, as posters are not common at the major conferences in student affairs.  It was a good experience to distill the essence of our research into a quick 2-minute talk and engage in a conversation with those individuals who were interested in the research topic.  The most exciting (and unexpected!) part of the poster session though, was being asked by APS staff to record a short talk on our poster, which can be found on the APS YouTube channel. 

See her on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ralfQneREw

Rochelle Fisher, first year Master’s student in the Psychological Sciences program (Quantitative Psychology concentration):

Attending the APS conference this year was a great experience. I spent my time at APS participating in workshops, going to sessions by leaders in the field and also presenting research through the form of a poster presentation. The highlight of my experience at APS was the workshops that I attended. There was a large variety of budget friendly workshops to choose from. The information was concentrated into a short amount of time (around 4 hours) but the presenters were very knowledgeable in their specific areas and I learned more than I ever thought I could in a few hours.

Poster presentations were set up in a large common room and there were several themed sessions available. While this conference was larger than those I had previously attended it was well organized and had a variety of information available. There was at least one session every day that I felt was highly relevant to me. I also got to meet people in the field as well as graduate student representatives from APS who introduced me to the resources available to graduate student members of APS of which I had previously been unaware. 

Overall it was a great experience and I got to meet a lot of wonderful people. I also learned a great deal of new information and feel that I took a lot away from the conference. I recommend this conference for graduate students to further enhance their research presentation skills and to attend well planned sessions/workshops. 

Photos from the event:


PHOTO: JMU student
PHOTO: JMU student
PHOTO: JMU student
PHOTO: JMU student
PHOTO: JMU student
PHOTO: JMU student